Archive for the 'Science Publication' category

Thought of the Day

On the resetting of the date of original submission:

One thing it does is keep a lid on people submitting a priority place holder before the study is even half done. I could see this as a positive step. Anything to undermine scooping culture in science is good by me.

One response so far

Are your journals permitting only one "major revision" round?

Skeptic noted the following on a prior post:

First time submitted to JN. Submitted revision with additional experiments. The editor sent the paper to a new reviewer and he/she asks additional experiments. In the editor's word, "he has to reject the paper because this was the revision."

This echoes something I have only recently heard about from a peer. Namely that a journal editor said that a manuscript was being rejected due to* it being policy not to permit multiple rounds of revision after a "major revisions" decision.

The implications are curious. I have not yet ever been told by a journal editor that this is their policy when I have been asked to review a manuscript.

I will, now and again, give a second recommendation for Major Revisions if I feel like the authors are not really taking my points to heart after the first round. I may even switch from Minor Revisions to Major Revisions in such a case.

Obviously, since I didn't select the "Reject" option in these cases, I didn't make my review thinking that my recommendation was in fact a "Reject" instead of the "Major Revisions".

I am bothered by this. It seems that journals are probably adopting these policies because they can, i.e., they get far more submissions than they can print. So one way to go about triaging the avalanche is to assume that manuscripts that require more than one round of fighting over revisions can be readily discarded. But this ignores the intent of the peer reviewer to large extent.

Well, now that I know this about two journals for which I review, I will adjust my behavior accordingly. I will understand that a recommendation of "Major Revisions" on the revised version of the manuscript will be interpreted by the Editor as "Reject" and I will supply the recommendation that I intend.

Is anyone else hearing these policies from journals in their fields?
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*having been around the block a time or two I hypothesize that, whether stated or not, those priority ratings that peer reviewers are asked to supply have something to do with these decisions as well. The authors generally only see the comments and may have no idea that that "favorable" reviewer who didn't find much of fault with the manuscript gave them a big old "booooooring" on the priority rating.

47 responses so far

Is the J Neuro policy banning Supplemental Materials backfiring?

As you will recall, I was very happy when the Journal of Neuroscience decided to ban the inclusion of any Supplemental Materials in articles considered for publication. That move took place back in 2010.

Dr. Becca, however, made the following observation on a recent post:

I'm done submitting to J Neuro. The combination of endless experiment requests due to unlimited space and no supp info,

I find that to be a fascinating comment. It suggests that perhaps the J Neuro policy has been ineffectual, or even has backfired.

To be honest, I can't recall that I have noticed anything in a J Neuro article that I've read in the past few years that reminded me of this policy shift one way or the other.

How about you, Dear Reader? Noticed any changes that appear to be related to this banning of Supplemental Materials?

For that matter, has the banning of Supplemental Materials altered your perception of the science that is published in that journal?

44 responses so far

Chapeau

Occasionally you notice one of your colleagues pulling off something you hope for within your own group.

When your manuscript gets rejected from one journal you would typically submit it to an approximately equal* journal next, hoping to get a more favorable mix of AE and reviewers.

If you've worked up more data that could conceivable fit with the rejected set, maybe you would submit upward, trying a journal with a better reputation.

What is slightly less-usual is taking the same manuscript, essentially unrevised and submitting it to a journal of better reputation or JIF or whathave you.

Getting that self-same manuscript accepted, essentially unchanged, is a big win.

Chapaeau, my friends.

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*You do this, right?

13 responses so far

I really need to start one of these citation cartels....

From Odyssey:

It's become apparent to me that there is a group of reviewers who all display the same phenotype when it comes to their reviews. They all i) are quick to agree to review manuscripts in our common sub-sub-field, ii) submit their reviews on time, and iii) will recommend acceptance or minor revisions for all manuscripts. All.

 

On time? Suspicious that.

Did I mention that this bloc of reviewers are all strongly linked to one particular well-known member of our sub-sub-field? Former trainees, co-authors etc.

 

siiigh.

 

 

 

No responses yet

How does your field view PLoS ONE?

Dec 27 2014 Published by under PLoS ONE, Science Publication

Open Access dude Michael Eisen is discussing his favorite publishing outfit on the Twitts and the conversation landed on this question. Thought I'd ask you, Dear Reader.

The second part is, how could the image and reputation of PLoS ONE be improved in your subfield?

I see the pathway in my field to be via people who are seen as movers and shakers putting their respectable work there.

I don't know how to make that happen. Perhaps individual lobbying?

The youngster gunner types aren't going to want to risk it, of course. So we can't depend on them. Mid career plodders like myself publishing there is almost going to make things worse. I think the plan would have to be to personally target established, well-regarded oldsters.

59 responses so far

H-index

I can't think of a time when seeing someone's h-index created a discordant view of their impact. Or for that matter when reviewing someones annual cites was surprising.

I just think the Gestalt impression you generate about a scientist is going to correlate with most quantification measures.

Unless there are weird outliers I suppose. But is there is something peculiar about a given scientist's publications that skews one particular measure of awesomeness....wouldn't someone being presented that measure discount accordingly?

Like if a h-index was boosted by a host of middle author contributions to a much more highly cited domain than the one most people associate you with? That sort of thing.

36 responses so far

Authorship decisions

Deciding who should and should not be on the author line of a science publication is not as simple as it seems. As we know, citations matter, publications matter and there are all sorts of implications for authorship of a science publication.

A question about this arose on the Twitts:

Of course, we start from a very basic concept. Authorship of a scientific paper is deserved when someone has made a significant contribution to that paper. I can't distill it down any more than that. Nice and clean.

The trouble comes in when we consider the words significant and contribution.

This is where people disagree.

I also rely on another basic concept which is that someone should try to match, to a large extent, the practices within the subfields from which similar work is published. This can mean the journal itself, the scientific sub-domain or the institution type from which the paper is being submitted.

On to the specifics of this case.

First, do note that I understand that not everyone is in the position to wield ultimate authority when it comes to these matters. @forensictoxguy appears to be able to decide so we'll take it from that perspective. I will mention, however, that even if you are not the deciderer for your papers, you can certainly have an opinion and advocate this opinion with the person in charge of the decision making.

My first observation is that there is nothing wrong with single-author papers. They might be rare these days but they do occur. So don't be afraid to offer up a single-author paper now and again.

With that said, we now move on to the fact that the author line is a communication. Whether you are trying to convey a message about yourself as a scientist or not, your CV tells a story about you. And everything on there has potential implications for some audiences.

ethical, schmethical. Again, you don't throw someone on a paper "just because", you do it because they made a contribution. A contribution that you, as the primary/communicating/deciderering author, get to determine and evaluate. It is not impossible that these other people referred to in the Tweet made, or will make, a contribution. It could be via setting the environment (physical resources, administrative requirements, funding, etc), training the author or it could be through direct assistance with crafting the manuscript after all the work has been done. All of these are valid as domains for significant contribution.

This scenario of a private industry research lab appears, from the tweets, to be one where the colleagues and higher-ups are not intimately involved in pushing paper submissions. It appears to be a case where the author in question is deciding whether or not to even bother publishing papers. Therefore, the politics of ignoring more-senior folks (if they exist) is unfamiliar. I can't do much but read through the Tweet lines and assume this person is not risking annoying someone who is their boss. Obviously if someone in a boss-like status would be miffed, it is in your interest to find some way that they can make a contribution that is significant in your own understanding or to have a bloody discussion about it at the very least.

Leaving off the local politics, we can turn to the implications for your CV and the story of you as a scientist that it is going to tell.

If all you ever have are first-author publications it will look, to the modern eye, like you are non-collaborative, meaning not a team player. This is probably an impression you would like to avoid, yes, even within an industrial setting. But this is easy to minimize. I can't set any hard and fast rules but if you have some solo-author and some multiple-author pubs sprinkled throughout your timeline, I can't see this being a big deal. Particularly if your employment particulars do not demand a lot of pubs and, see above, the other people around you are not publishing. Eventually it would become clear that you are the one pushing publication so it isn't weird to see solo-author works.

Consider, however, that you are possibly losing the opportunity to burnish your credentials. The current academic science arc has an expectation for first-author papers as a trainee (grad student, postdoc) which is then supposed to transition to last-author pubs as a scientific supervisory person (aka professor or PI). Industry, I surmise, can have a similar path whereby you start out as some sort of lowly Scientist and then transition to a Manager where you are supervising a team.

In both of these scenarios, academic and industry, looking like you are a team-organizing, synthetic force is good. Adding more authors can be helpful in creating this impression. Looking like you are the driving intellectual participant on a sub-area of science is good. This concern looks like it votes for thinning your authorship lines- after all, someone else in your group might start to leech credit away from you if they appear consistently or in a position (read: last author, co-contributing author) that implies they are more of the unifying intellectual driver.

This is where you need to actually think about your situation.

I tell trainees who are worried about being hosed out of that one deserved first-author position or being forced to accept a co-contributing second author this
; You are in for the long haul. If you are publishing multiple papers in this area of science (and you should be) then for the most part you will have first-authors and in the end analysis it will be clear that you are the consistent and most important participant. It will be a simple matter for your CV to communicate that you are the ONE. So it may not be worth sweating the small stuff on each contentious author issue.

In a related vein, it costs you little to be generous, particularly with middle authors that have next to no impact on your credit for this work.

If you only plan to publish one paper, obviously this changes the calculation.

Do you ever plan to make a push for management? Whether of the academic PI or industry variety, I think it is useful to lay down a record of being the leader of the team. That can mean being communicating author or being last author. At some point, even in industry, an ambitious scientist may wish to start being last author even under the above-mentioned scenario.

This is what brand new PIs have to do. Find someone, anyone to be the first author on pubs so that they can be the last author. This is absolutely necessary for the CV as a communication device. Undergrad volunteer? Rotation student? Summer intern? No problem, they can be the first author right? Their level of contribution is not really the issue. I can see an industry scientist that wants to start making a push for management doing something similar to this.

As always, I return to the concept that you have to do your own research within your own situation to figure out what the expectations are. Look at what most people like yourself, in your situation, tend to do. That's your starting point. Then think about how your CV is going to look to people over the medium and long term. And make your authorship decisions accordingly.

92 responses so far

Supplementary Materials practices rob authors of citation credit

This is all the fault of qaz. And long time reader Nat had a blog post on this ages ago.

First, I shouldn't have to remind you all that much about a simple fact of nature in the academic crediting system. Citations matter. Our quality and status as academic scientists will be judged, in small or in large ways, by the citations that our own publications garner.

This is not to say the interpretation of citations is all the same because it most assuredly is not. Citation counting leads to all sorts of distilled measures across your career arc- Highly Cited and the h-index are two examples. Citation counting can be used to judge the quality of your individual paper as well- from the total number of cites, to the sustained citing across the years to the impressive-ness of the journals in which your paper has been cited.

Various stakeholders may disagree over which measure of citation of your work is most critical.

On one thing everyone agrees.

Citations matter.

One problem (out of many) with the "Supplementary Materials", that are now very close to required at some journals and heavily encouraged at others, is that they are ignored by the ISI's Web of Science indexing and, so far as I can tell, Google Scholar.

So, by engaging in this perverted system by which journals are themselves competing with each other, you* are robbing your colleagues of their proper due.

Nat observed that you might actually do this intentionally, if you are a jerk.

So now, not only can supplementary info be used as a dumping ground for your inconclusive or crappy data, but you can also stick references to your competitors in there and shaft them their citations.

Try not to be a jerk. Resist this Supplementary Materials nonsense. Science will be the better for it.

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*yes, this includes me. I just checked some Supplementary citations that we've published to see if either ISI or Google Scholar indexes them- they do not.

25 responses so far

Thought of the day

Dec 05 2014 Published by under Replication, ReplicationCrisis, Science Publication

One thing that always cracks me up about manuscript review is the pose struck* by some reviewers that we cannot possibly interpret data or studies that are not perfect.

There is a certain type of reviewer that takes the stance* that we cannot in any way compare treatment conditions if there is anything about the study that violates some sort of perfect, Experimental Design 101 framing even if there is no reason whatsoever to suspect a contaminating variable. Even if, and this is more hilarious, if there are reasons in the data themselves to think that there is no effect of some nuisance variable.

I'm just always thinking....

The very essence of real science is comparing data across different studies, papers, paradigms, laboratories, etc and trying to come up with a coherent picture of what might be a fairly invariant truth about the system under investigation.

If the studies that you wish to compare are in the same paper, sure, you'd prefer to see less in the way of nuisance variation than you expect when making cross-paper comparisons. I get that. But still....some people.

Note: this is some way relates to the alleged "replication crisis" of science.
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*having nothing to go on but their willingness to act like the manuscript is entirely uninterpretable and therefore unpublishable, I have to assume that some of them actually mean it. Otherwise they would just say "it would be better if...". right?

8 responses so far

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