Archive for the 'Day in the life of DrugMonkey' category

Thought of the Day

On the resetting of the date of original submission:

One thing it does is keep a lid on people submitting a priority place holder before the study is even half done. I could see this as a positive step. Anything to undermine scooping culture in science is good by me.

One response so far

Day in the life

Jan 09 2015 Published by under Day in the life of DrugMonkey

soooooo much analysis of data points today. got kind of fired up by something that occurred on the way in so I ended up pulling data threads. and another. and another.

By the time I looked up it was time to go get the kids.

FTW but man are my eyes tired.

3 responses so far

Happy New Year

Jan 01 2015 Published by under Careerism, Day in the life of DrugMonkey

Here's to wishing all of my Readers a fantastic 2015.

May your grants be funded, your papers accepted and your promotions obtained.

I am looking forward to a year in which my work needle is shifted from the grant writing side to the paper publishing side...I do appreciate those moments.

We had a bit of new assay development last year that should, in theory, move into the productivity stage. I don't know what all we will get done but it will be interesting. To me, if nobody else (and that's what matters, right?).

There are two non-data things I need to finally write this year. One is a review, the other is a something-else I've been trying to write for several years now.

I need to recruit at least one postdoc....

It is NOT, despite temptation, a year to get involved in University political machinations. I know better and must resist.

I contemplate, as always, the deficiencies of the NIH grant scheme and think about the places I need to poke. If Sally Rockey is really leaving then this is a place to turn up the blog noise when her successor arrives. My IRL moves are, naturally, directed much closer to the ground game.

Exercise more, drink less (coffee and alcohol). I am in generous company there, I suspect.

Plot the next assault on a Big Mech. I am of mixed opinion as you know, Dear Reader. Naturally I am wary of boondoggles. They can be highly inefficient and are a huge pain in the butt for the main people driving the program. However, this is one area that arises from a crystal clear strategic need and a misfit with traditional R01s.

Actually there are two of them I need to pursue. One really needs to be done so that the little subfield stops screwing around continuing to fail upwards in tiny increments. The biggest hurdle here is actually of the personnel / political variety...and I suck at navigating those. I am not sympathetic to egos when NIH grants are on the line and I have no idea how to communicate with the egotistical type. The second project is much easier from the personnel standpoint because it can move forward with the good-personality people as the major players and YHN as the major figure. For this one the hurdle is clearly the science, meaning Program and peer-review enthusiasm.

I take two really vacationy vacations each year. The kind where I don't even try to work and where we have a ton of help wrangling the offspring. You know the type. I have to figure out how to expand those by about 50%.

15 responses so far

2015

Dec 19 2014 Published by under Day in the life of DrugMonkey

My plan is to stir up some trouble.

What do you have on tap for 2015?

41 responses so far

Thought of the Day

Dec 09 2014 Published by under BlogBlather, Day in the life of DrugMonkey

People selected to pontificate at an audience on the basis of prior accomplishments in a related context are invariably less interesting than people selected because they have interesting things to say.

8 responses so far

Thanks

Nov 27 2014 Published by under BlogBlather, Day in the life of DrugMonkey

Today in the USA we think of all the things we are thankful for.

I am thankful for another year of awesome from you, Dear Readers. Thanks for reading, for commenting, for writing your Congress Critters, for challenging the bad in academic careers, for donating to school classrooms and for generally giving a care about this world we live in.

And for the hilarity. Thanks for that.

5 responses so far

Small happy moments

I love it when the reviewers really GET the paper, what we are trying to do and why it is important!

10 responses so far

Pet Peeve: "the literature"

One precious tic of academic writing I implore you to avoid is "...in the literature".

"Novel contribution to the literature..."

"Unknown in the literature..."

"Fill a gap in the literature..."

You know what I mean.

The impression you create is that this is some silly self-referential game with only internal measures of importance.

Whether this is how you see science or not.....avoid creating this impression.

Talk about knowledge or understanding instead.

23 responses so far

Sometimes.....

Oct 09 2014 Published by under Day in the life of DrugMonkey

via deviant art

15 responses so far

America does the right thing

Oct 06 2014 Published by under Day in the life of DrugMonkey

At first you might think it a negative that the US Supreme Court refused to hear five gay marriage cases this term.

The Supreme Court on Monday turned away appeals from five states looking to prohibit gay marriage, effectively legalizing same-sex marriage in those states and likely others -- but also leaving the issue unresolved nationally.

The justices rejected appeals from Indiana, Oklahoma, Utah, Virginia and Wisconsin. The court's order immediately ends delays on gay marriage in those states.

Couples in six other states -- Colorado, Kansas, North Carolina, South Carolina, West Virginia and Wyoming -- also should be able to get married in short order. Those states would be bound by the same appellate rulings that were put on hold pending the Supreme Court's review. That would make same-sex marriage legal in 30 states and the District of Columbia.

So they haven't "finished the job". So what. The nationwide trend on this is clear and we will have only the smallest bumps ahead as more lower courts find that what SCOTUS did in the Federal decisions applies in their jurisdictions as well. More than half the population now lives in a jurisdiction that permits same-sex marriage. Or as more States decide to legalize same-sex marriage and nobody complains (at the legal level).

This is what happened with Loving v. Virginia too. Perhaps Roe v. Wade as well?

SCOTUS waiting for tides to turn in a particular direction within the country has precedent. And today, they announced they will not try to move that tide, they will watch it. And that is a good thing.

Today was a win for civil rights and I'm going to celebrate it as such.

12 responses so far

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