Thought of the Day

It's not ideal for your summary statement to show up whilst at a meeting attended by many of the people on the review panel.

16 responses so far

  • becca says:

    Of course it is! DIY glitter bombs are much cheaper than the remote order kind.

  • Philapodia says:

    I would pay good money to see you getting on top of your table at the evening reception and yelling at that asshat Reviewer #3 (you know who you are!) after you get a couple of wine spritzer's into you.

  • Grumble says:

    Depends what the summary statement says.

  • Abc123 says:

    Why not? What if the investigator wants to talk face to face to hir Program Director who is at the meeting?. (Of course, not looking for talk to any of the reviewers).

  • Ola says:

    I would argue it is ideal. It allows you to directly ask a reviewer WTH happened. Of course, they're not obliged to tell the truth, but if you have a good read of people's faces, it's harder for someone to BS you in person, versus over the phone or email.

  • drugmonkey says:

    You are not supposed to discuss the specifics of your NIH grant review with any members of the study section, Ola.

  • odyssey says:

    Been there. Not ideal. At all.

  • Ola says:

    Yes I know that, but look me in the pixels of your iPhone screen and tell me you haven't at least asked someone on SS about it? Can anyone on SS say they haven't been approached by an applicant and asked how it went? We all know there's the rules on how everyone's supposed to conduct themselves, and then the reality of what goes on every day but just never officially gets spoken about.

  • drugmonkey says:

    1) I have not asked anyone on SS about the review of my grants. ever.

    2) I have never been approached by anyone asking me about how the review of their grant went down in any SS I've attended.

  • I have never, ever asked a study section member any questions about review of my grant. I have only ever been asked by someone about review of their grant once, and I told them that there was no way we were going to discuss it and that they should not ask about it.

  • drugmonkey says:

    Obviously, mutual acknowledgement that you had a grant in a particular SS round for which another person appeared on the roster is fine. You just cannot discuss anything specific about the review of your grant (or any other).

    3) on maybe two or three occasions I have had a person who was on the review of my grant say something along the lines of "I was pulling for it" in which case I have always said a noncommittal "mmhmm" and moved the conversation elsewhere.

  • Dave says:

    I would argue it is ideal. It allows you to directly ask a reviewer WTH happened.

    Errrrrr, wot?

  • The Other Dave says:

    You go out to dinner with a few of them, drink a lot (a lot!), and then eventually leave a bit early, saying: "Hey sorry about the bill but I just found out my grant won't be funded so I can't afford to pay. See ya!"

    And then you go drink someplace else with real friends.

  • namnezia says:

    It's ideal for depositing a severed horse head in their backpack.

  • Out-of-business-bob says:

    I wish it would happen. We just got a 'not discussed' on a grant that received a 30 on a different panel in the last round. Pretty much identical grant applications. I'd love to have them explain why your score is really +/- 25 points and have them justify why NIH review isn't a complete crap shoot.

  • Luminiferous Aether says:

    ^^ "I'd love to have them explain why your score is really +/- 25 points"

    You answered your own question - because it's a different panel. Different strokes for different folks.

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