College on Problems of Drug Dependence tiptoes into WebEleventy?

For the half-dozen or so of my readers who are actually drug abuse scientists I note the recent issue of the Newsline of CPDD contains an interesting observation from the Publications Committee:

In addition, there are an increasing number of information venues becoming available. As more and more people use forms of communication such as blogs, the microblogging site Twitter and social networking sites such as FaceBook and MySpace, a move to utilize such venues for communication among CPDD members becomes more attractive. It will become important to discuss which of these venues will be useful for society communication.

I recently noted the Society for Neuroscience is trying (in their own way, chill out) to get with the social media program. The CPDD is far behind but at least thinking about "what's all this TwitterBook and FaceBlog now?".
How about your academic societies, DearReader? Are they getting with the Web2.0 program?

3 responses so far

  • Mike Olson says:

    While I by no means take offense to it and realize this is a great forum for you to keep in contact with your fellow research scientists, I feel compelled to make the following statement: I truly appreciate that you tend to post about science on science blogs. Many of the other posts I tend to agree with politically, but I can have the same discussion on the forums to the local paper. I enjoy reading topics that are about science and tech...I got tired of all the back and forth name calling at the local paper's website. In 1986 I was researching for a post grad degree in clinical psych. For twenty years my access to papers and articles written at that level was greatly limited. Knowing that I can come here and read current research on a variety of topics....really makes me feel good and allows me to more actively use my mind. I sincerely appreciate that.

  • SciWo says:

    The Geological Society of America has an active presence on twitter from @geosociety, is running a keynote session on digital geology (including social media), and is encouraging geo-bloggers attending the upcoming meeting to list themselves on a blogroll hosted on the society web site. I also know that AGU has some similar stuff in the works, though @theAGU on twitter is not as active. So, yes, the geoscientists get it, mostly.

  • DrugMonkey says:

    Following on to SciWo's point, there is a great description of the GSA's outlook on social media coverage of their annual meeting here at All My Faults Are Stress Related.

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