Publisher wants to take journal Open Access

(by drugmonkey) Oct 12 2015

Someone forwarded me what appears to be credible evidence that Wiley is considering taking Addiction Biology Open Access.

To the tune of $2,500 per article.

At present this title has no page charges within their standard article size.

This is interesting because Wiley purchased this title quite a while ago at a JIF that was at or below my perception of my field's dump-journal level.

They managed to march the JIF up the ranks and get it into the top position in the ISI Substance Abuse category. This, IMO, then stoked a virtuous cycle in which people submit better and better work there.

At some point in the past few years the journal went from publishing four issues per year to six. And the JIF remains atop the category.

As a business, what would you do? You build up a service until it is in high demand and then you try to cash in, that's what.

Personally I think this will kill the golden goose. It will be a slow process, however, and Wiley will make some money in the mean time.

The question is, do most competitors choose to follow suit? If so, Wiley wins big because authors will eventually have no other option. If the timing is good, Addiction Biology makes money early and then keeps on going as the leader of the pack.

All y'all Open Access wackaloons believe this is inevitable and are solidly behind Wiley's move, no doubt.

I will be fascinated to see how this one plays out.

13 responses so far

Question for the critic of pre-publication review (such as @mbeisen)

(by drugmonkey) Oct 07 2015

Where is the incentive for authors to respond to post-publication review?

The pre-publication review hurdle induces authors to alter the manuscript. In ways minor (modifying the strength of conclusions, adding reference to relevant prior work) and major (new experiments).

Most often this improves the final work.

Taking away the barrier of initial publication removes the incentive to modify the manuscript. How is this to be replaced?

47 responses so far

Grant in Review LOLzies

(by drugmonkey) Oct 06 2015

Probably one of the most hilarious comments I've ever received in review of one of my grants boiled down to this.

"Your colleagues have boatloads of grant money to work on Topic X. Why have you not produced more publications on Topic X with their resources? .....anyway, so therefore your new application on Topic Y sucks. "

[My recollection is that my productivity on Topic Y was mentioned by other reviewers as a strength if anything. If not on that particular proposal, than on other ones around the same time.]

22 responses so far


(by drugmonkey) Oct 06 2015

South Carolinans are suffering from torrential rains.

I feel sorry for them.

Well, some of them, anyway.

You see, it took no time at all to be reminded that most of the SC Congressional delegation voted against Federal relief aid during Hurricane Sandy.

Of course they are mostly Republicans.

Which means the majority of SC voters are voting Republican.

And the very essence of Republicanism is to greedily suck from the public for ones own benefit whilst denying any public benefit to anyone else.

This is not a decent way to behave.

So yeah. Let's check those voting records before sending in FEMA relief, eh? Let's hold Republicans true to their self-sufficient, non-taker, gub'mint hating beliefs.

The decent people could use a little extra. Let's focus on them.

16 responses so far

Rockey Explains Indirect Costs

(by drugmonkey) Oct 05 2015

11 responses so far

Nth year postdocs do not appreciate new grad students being put on the project

(by drugmonkey) Oct 05 2015

2 responses so far

Survey of the day: Postdoc diploma

(by drugmonkey) Oct 02 2015

Are you familiar with any Universities that award some sort of  official recognition of the completion of a postdoctoral term of scientific training? 
When, where, etc if you feel comfortable.....

30 responses so far

Throwing punches about PubPeer

(by drugmonkey) Sep 30 2015


PS Brookes has posted a spirited critique of an Op-Ed offered by Michael R. Blatt, EIC of Plant Physiology.


[Blatt] then adds this beauty…

“So, whatever the shortfalls of the peer-review process, I do not accept the argument that it is failing, that it is a threat to progress, or that, as scientists, we need to retake control of our profession. Indeed, if there is a threat to the scientific process, I would argue that, unchecked, the most serious is the brand of vigilante science currently facilitated by PubPeer.”

So let’s get this straight – the problems facing science today are not: (i) a lack of funding,  (ii) rampant fakery, (iii) politicians seeking to defund things they don’t like, (iv) inadequate teaching of the scientific method in schools, (v) proliferation of the blood-sucking profiteering publishing industry, (vi) an obsession with impact factor and other outdated metrics, (vii) a broken training to job pipeline in academia, (viii) insert your favorite #scipocalypse cause here.

Go read the Editorial and then the takedown.

Continue Reading »

28 responses so far

End of year pickups

(by drugmonkey) Sep 29 2015

It's one of those times of years to go a-RePORTERing, my friends. Select 9/1 or 9/15 in the Project Start Date field and put your favorite IC in the field for that.

As the NIH reaches the end of the federal fiscal year, they have to balance their budget. Meaning that in many cases they will pick up out-of-order grants to satisfy some goal or other. No doubt sometimes it is just making the dollars and cents add up by slotting in a few more R03 or R21 grants.

Maybe it is a chance for them to trigger on priorities that they have been letting simmer on the back burner or maybe it is a class of grants that has to wait until the end of the year for some reason. BigMechs seem to be funded during September in several of my favorite ICs.

I seem to notice SBIR/STTR grants (R41, R42, R43, R44 mechs) rolling out, which makes sense. The overall NIH has a certain percentage it has to meet in terms of SBIR awards and I assume this rolls downhill to the IC level. So this is part of the balancing of books for the final accounting.

The thing I was noticing this year is that the list of grant awards from my favorite ICs seems...interesting. To me anyway. And given when I tend to find interesting (i.e., the unusual) it would be no surprise if this was as feature not a bug. I.e, real.

Look at it this way. The unusual has the potential to be treated somewhat poorly by study sections or it wouldn't be an unusual application. If you subscribe to a view that study sections suffer from a certain conservatism (and I do subscribe) than it makes sense that the end of year pickups might be interesting due to them being unusual. Perhaps there are POs who likewise look at the list of near-misses and are attracted to the grant application that offers a little breath of fresh air. Perhaps it is because there are the odd RFA extras that can be squeezed under the budget line.

...or maybe I am extrapolating too far from very limited data.

13 responses so far

Repost: "Thanks, Doc."

(by drugmonkey) Sep 28 2015

Reposting due to recent comment thread. This post originally appeared on the blog 8/28/2008.

Watching Michelle Obama speak at the Democratic Convention this week was awe inspiring and hope uplifting for many Americans and others worldwide. I was feelin' it myself. But what really hammered home the real message here, for me, was listening to various media interviews with African-American women. They explained in both humble and soaring terms how important it was for their dreams, aspirations and parental hopes that Michelle stood up there, brilliant, black, beautiful, charismatic and, let's face it, just plain fabulous. Her strength and will as an advocate for the downtrodden, her country and her family alike was a big hit for women everywhere who finally, finally see families that are just like theirs making a serious run at the US Presidency.

This reminds me of a phenomenon experienced by a scientist with whom I am familiar.

"The conversation usually ends with 'Thanks Doc, it means a lot'."

It is no news that US research science looks like a little bit of apartheid. White folks are overrepresented in the faculty ranks and overrepresented in the trainee ranks down to the undergraduate level, relative to the general US population. Frequently enough relative to local city or state populations as well. African-Americans and Latino-Americans are considerably underrepresented.

[Don't yeah-but me with your favorite allegedly overrepresented group in the comments, it is irrelevant to today's discussion.]

In the service ranks, this is a different story. Visit a few Universities around the country, attend scientific meetings in the usual hotspots of Washington DC, New Orleans, Atlanta, San Diego, Los Angeles, Chicago and unless you are in complete denial or completely oblivious you notice something.

African-Americans and Latino-Americans (and some additional nonwhite ethnic groups) are considerably overrepresented in the service ranks. Administrative assistants, janitors, animal care techs, facilities staff, hotel and convention name it.

These national realities are not just anecdotes, of course. Every time we talk about affirmative action issues in the Academy on a national level, the dismal stats are related.

I make my views on casting a wide net and dismantling artificial barriers to success in science pretty clear in my blogging. I argue this both from the perspective of an advocate for my scientific domain who wants progress made and as an advocate for the individual scientist and his/her career.

Michelle Obama and the scientist who receives the "Thanks Doc" conversations remind me of another important, perhaps more important, reason for dismantling artificial barriers to science career success.

It matters that "people who look like me, are like me, have families like me" are a highly visible part of the landscape. It matters a lot. And this is why I will smack down knuckleheads who bleat on about quotas and "taking slots from the more deserving" and crap like that. First, of course, because those types (almost hysterically, unbelievably, overrepresented in the fizzycyst population) display a fundamental intuitive misunderstanding of populations, central tendencies, variance in the distribution and the rarity of extreme talents.

Second, because they disingenuously ignore the warm fuzzies, opportunities and biases associated with the vast majority of the Academy looking just like them. Third because these morally shriveled little wankers are just plain fun to tweak and can be tangled up in their inconsistencies and hypocrisy with little effort. But I digress.

Unsurprisingly, the scientist to whom I am referring looks somewhat other than the vast majority of independent scientists at the University in question. Actually, I think people have a fairly difficult time discerning just what ethnic association fits but lets just say "nonwhite", pointedly underrepresented in science. Of a variety with which many people who work in support roles at the University in question identify. Ethnicity pegging is not helped in that this person does not speak, act, associate, recreate, hobby-ate, idea-ate, iPod-ate, etc in any particularly ethnically-specific or stereotypic ways that I can detect. This observation is quite important. Unlike Michelle Obama, for whom many aspects of the identity package are consistent with the women being interviewed on the radio this week, this scientist basically only looks "like them".

My subject scientist relates numerous conversations which follow a common thread. Some staff person will drop by the office to say "Thanks Doc. It's really important to see one of us in this office doing this job."

That is the crux of the issue. Image is important. Identity is important. It matters to the larger issues of diversity that we have readily apparent, quotidian, barebones diversity. It matters to our social fabric of opportunity and fairness. It matters to the fundamental principles of what it means to be an American citizen when we are talking politics. It matters to the fundamental principles of the Academy as well.

10 responses so far

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